10 publications

10 publications

A General Method for Artificial Metalloenzyme Formationthrough Strain-Promoted Azide–Alkyne Cycloaddition

Lewis, J.C.

ChemBioChem 2014, 15, 223-227, 10.1002/cbic.201300661

Strain‐promoted azide–alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) can be used to generate artificial metalloenzymes (ArMs) from scaffold proteins containing a p‐azido‐L‐phenylalanine (Az) residue and catalytically active bicyclononyne‐substituted metal complexes. The high efficiency of this reaction allows rapid ArM formation when using Az residues within the scaffold protein in the presence of cysteine residues or various reactive components of cellular lysate. In general, cofactor‐based ArM formation allows the use of any desired metal complex to build unique inorganic protein materials. SPAAC covalent linkage further decouples the native function of the scaffold from the installation process because it is not affected by native amino acid residues; as long as an Az residue can be incorporated, an ArM can be generated. We have demonstrated the scope of this method with respect to both the scaffold and cofactor components and established that the dirhodium ArMs generated can catalyze the decomposition of diazo compounds and both SiH and olefin insertion reactions involving these carbene precursors.


Metal: Rh
Ligand type: Poly-carboxylic acid
Host protein: tHisF
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: ---
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 81
ee: ---
PDB: 1THF
Notes: ---

Metal: Rh
Ligand type: Poly-carboxylic acid
Host protein: tHisF
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: ---
Reaction: Si-H insertion
Max TON: 7
ee: ---
PDB: 1THF
Notes: ---

An Artificial Heme Enzyme for Cyclopropanation Reactions

Roelfes, G.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, 57, 7785-7789, 10.1002/anie.201802946

An artificial heme enzyme was created through self‐assembly from hemin and the lactococcal multidrug resistance regulator (LmrR). The crystal structure shows the heme bound inside the hydrophobic pore of the protein, where it appears inaccessible for substrates. However, good catalytic activity and moderate enantioselectivity was observed in an abiological cyclopropanation reaction. We propose that the dynamic nature of the structure of the LmrR protein is key to the observed activity. This was supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which showed transient formation of opened conformations that allow the binding of substrates and the formation of pre‐catalytic structures.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Protoporphyrin IX
Host protein: LmrR
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 449
ee: 51
PDB: 6FUU
Notes: ---

An Artificial Metalloenzyme for Carbene Transfer Based on a Biotinylated Dirhodium Anchored Within Streptavidin

Ward, T.R.

Cat. Sci. Technol. 2018, 8, 2294-2298, 10.1039/C8CY00646F

We report an artificial carbenoid transferase which combines a biotinylated dirhodium moiety within streptavidin scaffold.


Metal: Rh
Ligand type: Carboxylate
Host protein: Streptavidin (Sav)
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: ~60
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Cyclopropanation reaction was also performed in the E. coli periplasm.

Metal: Rh
Ligand type: Carboxylate
Host protein: Streptavidin (Sav)
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: C-H insertion
Max TON: ~60
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

Beyond Iron: Iridium-Containing P450 Enzymes for Selective Cyclopropanations of Structurally Diverse Alkenes

Hartwig, J.F.

ACS Cent. Sci. 2017, 3, 302-308, 10.1021/acscentsci.6b00391

Enzymes catalyze organic transformations with exquisite levels of selectivity, including chemoselectivity, stereoselectivity, and substrate selectivity, but the types of reactions catalyzed by enzymes are more limited than those of chemical catalysts. Thus, the convergence of chemical catalysis and biocatalysis can enable enzymatic systems to catalyze abiological reactions with high selectivity. Recently, we disclosed artificial enzymes constructed from the apo form of heme proteins and iridium porphyrins that catalyze the insertion of carbenes into a C–H bond. We postulated that the same type of Ir(Me)-PIX enzymes could catalyze the cyclopropanation of a broad range of alkenes with control of multiple modes of selectivity. Here, we report the evolution of artificial enzymes that are highly active and highly stereoselective for the addition of carbenes to a wide range of alkenes. These enzymes catalyze the cyclopropanation of terminal and internal, activated and unactivated, electron-rich and electron-deficient, conjugated and nonconjugated alkenes. In particular, Ir(Me)-PIX enzymes derived from CYP119 catalyze highly enantio- and diastereoselective cyclopropanations of styrene with ±98% ee, >70:1 dr, >75% yield, and ∼10,000 turnovers (TON), as well as 1,2-disubstituted styrenes with up to 99% ee, 35:1 dr, and 54% yield. Moreover, Ir(Me)-PIX enzymes catalyze cyclopropanation of internal, unactivated alkenes with up to 99% stereoselectivity, 76% yield, and 1300 TON. They also catalyze cyclopropanation of natural products with diastereoselectivities that are complementary to those attained with standard transition metal catalysts. Finally, Ir(Me)-PIX P450 variants react with substrate selectivity that is reminiscent of natural enzymes; they react preferentially with less reactive internal alkenes in the presence of more reactive terminal alkenes. Together, the studies reveal the suitability of Ir-containing P450s to combine the broad reactivity and substrate scope of transition metal catalysts with the exquisite selectivity of enzymes, generating catalysts that enable reactions to occur with levels and modes of activity and selectivity previously unattainable with natural enzymes or transition metal complexes alone.


Metal: Ir
Ligand type: Methyl; Porphyrin
Host protein: Cytochrome P450 (CYP119)
Anchoring strategy: Metal substitution
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 10181
ee: 98
PDB: ---
Notes: Selectivity for cis product (cis/trans = 90:1)

Capture and Characterization of a Reactive Haem– Carbenoid Complex in an Artificial Metalloenzyme

Hilvert, D.

Nat. Catal. 2018, 1, 578-584, 10.1038/s41929-018-0105-6

Non-canonical amino acid ligands are useful for fine-tuning the catalytic properties of metalloenzymes. Here, we show that recombinant replacement of the histidine ligand proximal to haem in myoglobin with Nδ-methylhistidine enhances the protein’s promiscuous carbene-transfer chemistry, enabling efficient styrene cyclopropanation in the absence of reductant, even under aerobic conditions. The increased electrophilicity of the modified Fe(iii) centre, combined with subtle structural adjustments at the active site, allows direct attack of ethyl diazoacetate to produce a reactive carbenoid adduct, which has an unusual bridging Fe(iii)–C–N(pyrrole) configuration as shown by X-ray crystallography. Quantum chemical calculations suggest that the bridged complex equilibrates with the more reactive end-on isomer, ensuring efficient cyclopropanation. These findings underscore the potential of non-canonical ligands for extending the capabilities of metalloenzymes by opening up new reaction pathways and facilitating the characterization of reactive species that would not otherwise accumulate.


Metal: Fe
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: ---
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 1000
ee: 99
PDB: 6F17
Notes: Structure of the Mb*(NMH) haem-iron complex

Metal: Fe
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: ---
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 1000
ee: 99
PDB: 6G5B
Notes: Structure of the Mb*(NMH) haem-iron–carbenoid complex

Catalytic Cyclopropanation by Myoglobin Reconstituted with Iron Porphycene: Acceleration of Catalysis due to Rapid Formation of the Carbene Species

Hasegawa, J.-Y.; Lehnert, N.

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2017, 139, 17265-17268, 10.1021/jacs.7b10154

Myoglobin reconstituted with iron porphycene catalyzes the cyclopropanation of styrene with ethyl diazoacetate. Compared to native myoglobin, the reconstituted protein significantly accelerates the catalytic reaction and the kcat/Km value is 26-fold enhanced. Mechanistic studies indicate that the reaction of the reconstituted protein with ethyl diazoacetate is 615-fold faster than that of native myoglobin. The metallocarbene species reacts with styrene with the apparent second-order kinetic constant of 28 mM–1 s–1 at 25 °C. Complementary theoretical studies support efficient carbene formation by the reconstituted protein that results from the strong ligand field of the porphycene and fewer intersystem crossing steps relative to the native protein. From these findings, the substitution of the cofactor with an appropriate metal complex serves as an effective way to generate a new biocatalyst.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid; Porphycene
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: Reconstitution
Optimization: ---
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Cyclopropanation of styrene with ethyl diazoacetate: kcat/KM = 1.3 mM-1 * s-1, trans/cis = 99:1

Engineering a Dirhodium Artificial Metalloenzyme for Selective Olefin Cyclopropanation

Lewis, J.C.

Nat. Commun. 2015, 6, 10.1038/ncomms8789

Artificial metalloenzymes (ArMs) formed by incorporating synthetic metal catalysts into protein scaffolds have the potential to impart to chemical reactions selectivity that would be difficult to achieve using metal catalysts alone. In this work, we covalently link an alkyne-substituted dirhodium catalyst to a prolyl oligopeptidase containing a genetically encoded L-4-azidophenylalanine residue to create an ArM that catalyses olefin cyclopropanation. Scaffold mutagenesis is then used to improve the enantioselectivity of this reaction, and cyclopropanation of a range of styrenes and donor–acceptor carbene precursors were accepted. The ArM reduces the formation of byproducts, including those resulting from the reaction of dirhodium–carbene intermediates with water. This shows that an ArM can improve the substrate specificity of a catalyst and, for the first time, the water tolerance of a metal-catalysed reaction. Given the diversity of reactions catalysed by dirhodium complexes, we anticipate that dirhodium ArMs will provide many unique opportunities for selective catalysis.


Metal: Rh
Ligand type: Poly-carboxylic acid
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 74
ee: 92
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

Enzyme stabilization via computationally guided protein stapling

Fasan, R.; Khare, S.D.

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2017, 114, 12472-12477, 10.1073/pnas.1708907114

Thermostabilization represents a critical and often obligatory step toward enhancing the robustness of enzymes for organic synthesis and other applications. While directed evolution methods have provided valuable tools for this purpose, these protocols are laborious and time-consuming and typically require the accumulation of several mutations, potentially at the expense of catalytic function. Here, we report a minimally invasive strategy for enzyme stabilization that relies on the installation of genetically encoded, nonreducible covalent staples in a target protein scaffold using computational design. This methodology enables the rapid development of myoglobin-based cyclopropanation biocatalysts featuring dramatically enhanced thermostability (ΔTm = +18.0 °C and ΔT50 = +16.0 °C) as well as increased stability against chemical denaturation [ΔCm (GndHCl) = 0.53 M], without altering their catalytic efficiency and stereoselectivity properties. In addition, the stabilized variants offer superior performance and selectivity compared with the parent enzyme in the presence of a high concentration of organic cosolvents, enabling the more efficient cyclopropanation of a water-insoluble substrate. This work introduces and validates an approach for protein stabilization which should be applicable to a variety of other proteins and enzymes.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 4740
ee: 99.2
PDB: ---
Notes: Stapling of protein via thioether bond formation between the noncanonical amino acid O-2-bromoethyl tyrosine and cysteine

Evolving Artificial Metalloenzymes via Random Mutagenesis

Lewis, J.C.

Nat. Chem. 2018, 10, 318-324, 10.1038/nchem.2927

Random mutagenesis has the potential to optimize the efficiency and selectivity of protein catalysts without requiring detailed knowledge of protein structure; however, introducing synthetic metal cofactors complicates the expression and screening of enzyme libraries, and activity arising from free cofactor must be eliminated. Here we report an efficient platform to create and screen libraries of artificial metalloenzymes (ArMs) via random mutagenesis, which we use to evolve highly selective dirhodium cyclopropanases. Error-prone PCR and combinatorial codon mutagenesis enabled multiplexed analysis of random mutations, including at sites distal to the putative ArM active site that are difficult to identify using targeted mutagenesis approaches. Variants that exhibited significantly improved selectivity for each of the cyclopropane product enantiomers were identified, and higher activity than previously reported ArM cyclopropanases obtained via targeted mutagenesis was also observed. This improved selectivity carried over to other dirhodium-catalysed transformations, including N–H, S–H and Si–H insertion, demonstrating that ArMs evolved for one reaction can serve as starting points to evolve catalysts for others.


Metal: Rh
Ligand type: OAc
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 66
ee: 94
PDB: 5T88
Notes: Mutagenesis of the ArM by error-prone PCR

Metal: Rh
Ligand type: OAc
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: N-H Insertion
Max TON: 73
ee: 40
PDB: 5T88
Notes: Mutagenesis of the ArM by error-prone PCR

Metal: Rh
Ligand type: OAc
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: S-H insertion
Max TON: 64
ee: 32
PDB: 5T88
Notes: Mutagenesis of the ArM by error-prone PCR

Metal: Rh
Ligand type: OAc
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Si-H insertion
Max TON: 35
ee: 64
PDB: 5T88
Notes: Mutagenesis of the ArM by error-prone PCR

Orthogonal Expression of an Artificial Metalloenzyme for Abiotic Catalysis

Brustad, E.M.

ChemBioChem 2017, 18, 2380-2384, 10.1002/cbic.201700397

Engineering an (Ir)regular cytochrome P450: Mutations within the heme‐binding pocket of a cytochrome P450 enabled the selective incorporation of an artificial Ir‐porphyrin cofactor into the protein, in cells. This orthogonal metalloprotein showed enhanced behavior in unnatural carbene‐mediated cyclopropanation of aliphatic and electron‐deficient olefins.


Metal: Ir
Ligand type: Methyl; Porphyrin
Host protein: Cytochrome BM3h
Anchoring strategy: Reconstitution
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 339
ee: 97
PDB: ---
Notes: Reaction of styrene with ethyl diazoacetate, cis:trans = 29:71