5 publications

5 publications

Artificial Metalloenzymes as Selective Catalysts in Aqueous Media

Review

Ward, T.R.

Coord. Chem. Rev. 2008, 252, 751-766, 10.1016/j.ccr.2007.09.016

The fusion of homogeneous and enzymatic catalysis has recently drawn attention due to reported novel activities and high selectivities. The incorporation of metal-catalysts into proteins combines the advantages of both catalytic strategies. Herein we summarize recent approaches of artificial metalloenzymes applied to catalysis. The discussion includes different strategies of anchoring and screening for improved selectivity.


Notes: ---

Coordination Complexes and Biomolecules: A Wise Wedding for Catalysis Upgrade

Review

Gras, E.; Hureau, C.

Coord. Chem. Rev. 2016, 308, 445-459, 10.1016/j.ccr.2015.05.011

Artificial metalloenzymes, with their high selectivity and specificity combined with a wide scope of reactivity and substrates, constitute an original approach for catalyst development. Different strategies have been proposed for their elaboration, proceeding from modification of natural enzymes using bioengineering methods to de novo protein design. Another bio-inspired methodology for the development of hybrid catalysts consists in the incorporation of coordination complexes into biomolecules, with the aim to upgrade their catalytic abilities. In these systems, the reaction performed by the naked catalyst is modulated by the well-defined structure of the host biomolecule. This conveys added value to the catalyst, such as enantioselectivity or chemoselectivity. DNA, apo-enzymes, proteins and peptides have been engaged in this approach, affording a wide diversity of reactivities and substrates. The resulting systems can then be improved by combined chemical and bioengineering optimization, allowing access to powerful catalysts. Because this approach can virtually be applied to any biomolecule or coordination complex, the elaboration of bio-based hybrid catalysts seems promising for advance in catalysis.


Notes: ---

Coordination Design of Artificial Metalloproteins Utilizing Protein Vacant Space

Review

Watanabe, Y.

Coord. Chem. Rev. 2007, 251, 2717-2731, 10.1016/j.ccr.2007.04.007

Design of artificial metalloproteins is one of the most important subjects in the field of bioinorganic chemistry. In order to prepare them, vacant space of proteins has been utilized because it gives us unique chemical environment to construct catalysts and materials. This article reviews on preparation methods and properties of metal/protein composites. The discussion includes our recent results and development in the screening of composites, crystal structures, molecular design of bio-inspired systems concerning catalysts, electrochemistry, and materials.


Notes: ---

Designing Functional Metalloproteins: From Structural to Catalytic Metal Sites

Review

Pecoraro, V.L.

Coord. Chem. Rev. 2013, 257, 2565-2588, 10.1016/j.ccr.2013.02.007

Metalloenzymes efficiently catalyze some of the most important and difficult reactions in nature. For many years, coordination chemists have effectively used small molecule models to understand these systems. More recently, protein design has been shown to be an effective approach for mimicking metal coordination environments. Since the first designed proteins were reported, much success has been seen for incorporating metal sites into proteins and attaining the desired coordination environment but until recently, this has been with a lack of significant catalytic activity. Now there are examples of designed metalloproteins that, although not yet reaching the activity of native enzymes, are considerably closer. In this review, we highlight work leading up to the design of a small metalloprotein containing two metal sites, one for structural stability (HgS3) and the other a separate catalytic zinc site to mimic carbonic anhydrase activity (ZnN3O). The first section will describe previous studies that allowed for a high affinity thiolate site that binds heavy metals in a way that stabilizes three-stranded coiled coils. The second section will examine ways of preparing histidine-rich environments that lead to metal-based hydrolytic catalysts. We will also discuss other recent examples of the design of structural metal sites and functional metalloenzymes. Our work demonstrates that attaining the proper first coordination geometry of a metal site can lead to a significant fraction of catalytic activity, apparently independent of the type of secondary structure of the surrounding protein environment. We are now in a position to begin to meet the challenge of building a metalloenzyme systematically from the bottom-up by engineering and analyzing interactions directly around the metal site and beyond.


Notes: ---

Mimicking Hydrogenases: From Biomimetics to Artificial Enzymes

Review

Artero, V.

Coord. Chem. Rev. 2014, 270-271, 127-150, 10.1016/j.ccr.2013.12.018

Over the last 15 years, a plethora of research has provided major insights into the structure and function of hydrogenase enzymes. This has led to the important development of chemical models that mimic the inorganic enzymatic co-factors, which in turn has further contributed to the understanding of the specific molecular features of these natural systems that facilitate such large and robust enzyme activities. More recently, efforts have been made to generate guest–host models and artificial hydrogenases, through the incorporation of transition metal-catalysts (guests) into various hosts. This adds a new layer of complexity to hydrogenase-like catalytic systems that allows for better tuning of their activity through manipulation of both the first (the guest) and the second (the host) coordination spheres. Herein we review the aforementioned advances achieved during the last 15 years, in the field of inorganic biomimetic hydrogenase chemistry. After a brief presentation of the enzymes themselves, as well as the early bioinspired catalysts, we review the more recent systems constructed as models for the hydrogenase enzymes, with a specific focus on the various strategies employed for incorporating of synthetic models into supramolecular frameworks and polypeptidic/protein scaffolds, and critically discuss the advantages of such an elaborate approach, with regard to the catalytic performances.


Notes: ---