68 publications

68 publications

A "Broad Spectrum" Carbene Transferase for Synthesis of Chiral α-Trifluoromethylated Organoborons

Roelfes, G.

ACS Cent. Sci. 2019, 5, 206-208, 10.1021/acscentsci.9b00015

Directed evolution generated an enzyme for the enantioselective synthesis of α-trifluoromethylated organoborons—potentially attractive synthons for fluorinated compounds.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Host protein: Cytochrome c
Anchoring strategy: Native
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: B-H insertion
Max TON: 2900
ee: 95
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

Achiral Cyclopentadienone Iron Tricarbonyl Complexes Embedded in Streptavidin: An Access to Artificial Iron Hydrogenases and Application in Asymmetric Hydrogenation

Renaud, J.-L.; Ward, T.R.

Catal. Lett. 2016, 146, 564-569, 10.1007/s10562-015-1681-6

We report on the synthesis of biotinylated (cyclopentadienone)iron tricarbonyl complexes, the in situ generation of the corresponding streptavidin conjugates and their application in asymmetric hydrogenation of imines and ketones.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: CO; Cyclopentadienone
Host protein: Streptavidin (Sav)
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical
Reaction: Hydrogenation
Max TON: 20
ee: 34
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

Active Site Topology of Artificial Peroxidase-like Hemoproteins Based on Antibodies Constructed from a Specifically Designed Ortho-carboxy-substituted Tetraarylporphyrin

Mahy, J.-P.

Eur. J. Biochem. 1998, 257, 121-130, 10.1046/j.1432-1327.1998.2570121.x

The topology of the binding site has been studied for two monoclonal antibodies 13G10 and 14H7, elicited against iron(III)‐α,α,α,β‐meso‐tetrakis(ortho‐carboxyphenyl)porphyrin {α,α,α,β‐Fe[(o‐COOHPh)4‐porphyrin]}, and which exhibit in the presence of this α,α,α,β‐Fe[(o‐COOHPh)4‐porphyrin] cofactor a peroxidase activity. A comparison of the dissociation constants of the complexes of 13G10 and 14H7 with various tetra‐aryl‐substituted porphyrin has shown that : (a) the central iron(III) atom of α,α,α,β‐Fe[(o‐COOHPh)4‐porphyrin] is not recognized by either of the two antibodies; and (b) the ortho‐carboxylate substituents of the meso‐phenyl rings of α,α,α,β‐Fe[(o‐COOHPh)4‐porphyrin] are essential for the recognition of the porphyrin by 13G10 and 14H7. Measurement of the dissociation constants for the complexes of 13G10 and 14H7 with the four atropoisomers of (o‐COOHPh)4‐porphyrinH2 as well as mono‐ and di‐ortho‐carboxyphenyl‐substituted porphyrins suggests that the three carboxylates in the α, α, β position are recognized by both 13G10 and 14H7 with the two in the α, β positions more strongly bound to the antibody protein. Accordingly, the topology of the active site of 13G10 and 14H7 has roughly two‐thirds of the α,α,α,β‐Fe[(o‐COOHPh)4‐porphyrin] cofactor inserted into the binding site of the antibodies, with one of the aryl ring remaining outside. Three of the carboxylates are bound to the protein but no amino acid residue acts as an axial ligand to the iron atom. Chemical modification of lysine, histidine, tryptophan and arginine residues has shown that only modification of arginine residues causes a decrease in both the binding of α,α,α,β‐Fe[(o‐COOHPh)4‐porphyrin] and the peroxidase activity of both antibodies. Consequently, at least one of the carboxylates of the hapten is bound to an arginine residue and no amino acids such as lysine, histidine or tryptophan participate in the catalysis of the heterolytic cleavage of the O‐O bond of H2O2. In addition, the amino acid sequence of both antibodies not only reveals the presence of arginine residues, which could be those involved in the binding of the carboxylates of the hapten, but also the presence of several amino acids in the complementary determining regions which could bind other carboxylates through a network of H bonds.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: ---
Host protein: Antibody 13G10 / 14H7
Anchoring strategy: Antibody
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Peroxidation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

A Designed Heme-[4Fe-4S] Metalloenzyme Catalyzes Sulfite Reduction like the Native Enzyme

Lu, Y.

Science 2018, 361, 1098-1101, 10.1126/science.aat8474

Multielectron redox reactions often require multicofactor metalloenzymes to facilitate coupled electron and proton movement, but it is challenging to design artificial enzymes to catalyze these important reactions, owing to their structural and functional complexity. We report a designed heteronuclear heme-[4Fe-4S] cofactor in cytochrome c peroxidase as a structural and functional model of the enzyme sulfite reductase. The initial model exhibits spectroscopic and ligand-binding properties of the native enzyme, and sulfite reduction activity was improved—through rational tuning of the secondary sphere interactions around the [4Fe-4S] and the substrate-binding sites—to be close to that of the native enzyme. By offering insight into the requirements for a demanding six-electron, seven-proton reaction that has so far eluded synthetic catalysts, this study provides strategies for designing highly functional multicofactor artificial enzymes.


Metal: Fe
Host protein: Cytochrome c peroxidase
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Sulfite reduction
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Designed heteronuclear heme-[4Fe-4S] cofactor in cytochrome c peroxidase

A Hydrogenase Model System Based on the Sequence of Cytochrome c: Photochemical Hydrogen Evolution in Aqueous Media

Hayashi, T

Chem. Commun. 2011, 47, 8229, 10.1039/c1cc11157d

The diiron carbonyl cluster is held by a native CXXC motif, which includes Cys14 and Cys17, in the cytochrome c sequence. It is found that the diiron carbonyl complex works well as a catalyst for H2 evolution. It has a TON of ∼80 over 2 h at pH 4.7 in the presence of a Ru-photosensitizer and ascorbate as a sacrificial reagent in aqueous media.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Carbonyl
Host protein: Cytochrome c
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: ---
Reaction: H2 evolution
Max TON: 82
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Horse heart cytochrome C

Alteration of the Oxygen-Dependent Reactivity of De Novo Due Ferri Proteins

DeGrado, W.F.

Nat. Chem. 2012, 4, 900-906, 10.1038/NCHEM.1454

De novo proteins provide a unique opportunity to investigate the structure–function relationships of metalloproteins in a minimal, well-defined and controlled scaffold. Here, we describe the rational programming of function in a de novo designed di-iron carboxylate protein from the Due Ferri family. Originally created to catalyse the O2-dependent, two-electron oxidation of hydroquinones, the protein was reprogrammed to catalyse the selective N-hydroxylation of arylamines by remodelling the substrate access cavity and introducing a critical third His ligand to the metal-binding cavity. Additional second- and third-shell modifications were required to stabilize the His ligand in the core of the protein. These structural changes resulted in at least a 106-fold increase in the relative rate between the arylamine N-hydroxylation and hydroquinone oxidation reactions. This result highlights the potential for using de novo proteins as scaffolds for future investigations of the geometric and electronic factors that influence the catalytic tuning of di-iron active sites.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid
Host protein: Due Ferri
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: N-Hydroxylation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 2LFD
Notes: ---

A Metal Ion Regulated Artificial Metalloenzyme

Roelfes, G.

Dalton Trans. 2017, 46, 4325-4330, 10.1039/C7DT00533D

An artificial metalloenzyme containing both a regulatory and a catalytic domain is selectively activated in presence of Fe2+ ions.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Bypyridine
Host protein: LmrR
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Genetic
Max TON: 14
ee: 75
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

Metal: Zn
Ligand type: Bypyridine
Host protein: LmrR
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Genetic
Max TON: 6
ee: 80
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

An Artificial Di-Iron Oxo-Orotein with Phenol Oxidase Activity

DeGrado, W.F.; Lombardi, A.

Nat. Chem. Biol. 2009, 5, 882-884, 10.1038/nchembio.257

Here we report the de novo design and NMR structure of a four-helical bundle di-iron protein with phenol oxidase activity. The introduction of the cofactor-binding and phenol-binding sites required the incorporation of residues that were detrimental to the free energy of folding of the protein. Sufficient stability was, however, obtained by optimizing the sequence of a loop distant from the active site.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid
Host protein: Due Ferri
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Alcohol oxidation
Max TON: >50
ee: ---
PDB: 2KIK
Notes: kcat/KM ≈ 1380 M-1*min-1

Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid
Host protein: Due Ferri
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Amine oxidation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 2KIK
Notes: kcat/KM ≈ 83 M-1*min-1

An Artificial Enzyme Made by Covalent Grafting of an FeII Complex into β-Lactoglobulin: Molecular Chemistry, Oxidation Catalysis, and Reaction-Intermediate Monitoring in a Protein

Banse, F.; Mahy, J.-P.

Chem. - Eur. J. 2015, 21, 12188-12193, 10.1002/chem.201501755

An artificial metalloenzyme based on the covalent grafting of a nonheme FeII polyazadentate complex into bovine β‐lactoglobulin has been prepared and characterized by using various spectroscopic techniques. Attachment of the FeII catalyst to the protein scaffold is shown to occur specifically at Cys121. In addition, spectrophotometric titration with cyanide ions based on the spin‐state conversion of the initial high spin (S=2) FeII complex into a low spin (S=0) one allows qualitative and quantitative characterization of the metal center’s first coordination sphere. This biohybrid catalyst activates hydrogen peroxide to oxidize thioanisole into phenylmethylsulfoxide as the sole product with an enantiomeric excess of up to 20 %. Investigation of the reaction between the biohybrid system and H2O2 reveals the generation of a high spin (S=5/2) FeIII(η2‐O2) intermediate, which is proposed to be responsible for the catalytic sulfoxidation of the substrate.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Poly-pyridine
Host protein: ß-lactoglobulin
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: ---
Reaction: Sulfoxidation
Max TON: 5.6
ee: 20
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

An Artificial Heme Enzyme for Cyclopropanation Reactions

Roelfes, G.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, 57, 7785-7789, 10.1002/anie.201802946

An artificial heme enzyme was created through self‐assembly from hemin and the lactococcal multidrug resistance regulator (LmrR). The crystal structure shows the heme bound inside the hydrophobic pore of the protein, where it appears inaccessible for substrates. However, good catalytic activity and moderate enantioselectivity was observed in an abiological cyclopropanation reaction. We propose that the dynamic nature of the structure of the LmrR protein is key to the observed activity. This was supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which showed transient formation of opened conformations that allow the binding of substrates and the formation of pre‐catalytic structures.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Protoporphyrin IX
Host protein: LmrR
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 449
ee: 51
PDB: 6FUU
Notes: ---

An Artificial Oxygenase Built from Scratch: Substrate Binding Site Identified Using a Docking Approach

Cavazza, C.; Ménage, S.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 3922-3925, 10.1002/anie.201209021

The substrate for an artificial iron monooxygenase was selected by using docking calculations. The high catalytic efficiency of the reported enzyme for sulfide oxidation was directly correlated to the predicted substrate binding mode in the protein cavity, thus illustrating the synergetic effect of the substrate binding site, protein scaffold, and catalytic site.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: BPMCN; BPMEN
Host protein: NikA
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical
Reaction: Sulfoxidation
Max TON: 199
ee: ≤5
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

A Noncanonical Proximal Heme Ligand Affords an Efficient Peroxidase in a Globin Fold

Green, A.P.; Hilvert, D.

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2018, 140, 1535-1543, 10.1021/jacs.7b12621

Expanding the range of genetically encoded metal coordination environments accessible within tunable protein scaffolds presents excellent opportunities for the creation of metalloenzymes with augmented properties and novel activities. Here, we demonstrate that installation of a noncanonical Nδ-methyl histidine (NMH) as the proximal heme ligand in the oxygen binding protein myoglobin (Mb) leads to substantial increases in heme redox potential and promiscuous peroxidase activity. Structural characterization of this catalytically modified myoglobin variant (Mb NMH) revealed significant changes in the proximal pocket, including alterations to hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the prosthetic porphyrin cofactor. Further optimization of Mb NMH via a combination of rational modification and several rounds of laboratory evolution afforded efficient peroxidase biocatalysts within a globin fold, with activities comparable to those displayed by nature’s peroxidases.


Metal: Fe
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Oxidation
Max TON: ~1650
ee: ---
PDB: 5OJ9
Notes: Oxidation of amplex red

Artificial Heme Enzymes for the Construction of Gold-Based Biomaterials

Lombardi, A.; Nastri, F.

Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 2896, 10.3390/ijms19102896

Many efforts are continuously devoted to the construction of hybrid biomaterials for specific applications, by immobilizing enzymes on different types of surfaces and/or nanomaterials. In addition, advances in computational, molecular and structural biology have led to a variety of strategies for designing and engineering artificial enzymes with defined catalytic properties. Here, we report the conjugation of an artificial heme enzyme (MIMO) with lipoic acid (LA) as a building block for the development of gold-based biomaterials. We show that the artificial MIMO@LA can be successfully conjugated to gold nanoparticles or immobilized onto gold electrode surfaces, displaying quasi-reversible redox properties and peroxidase activity. The results of this work open interesting perspectives toward the development of new totally-synthetic catalytic biomaterials for application in biotechnology and biomedicine, expanding the range of the biomolecular component aside from traditional native enzymes.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid; Porphyrin
Anchoring strategy: Covalent
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Oxidation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Immobilization of the ArM on gold surfaces via a lipoic acid anchor.

Artificial Metalloenzymes as Catalysts for Oxidative Lignin Degradation

Jarvis, A.G.

ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng. 2018, 6, 15100-15107, 10.1021/acssuschemeng.8b03568

We report novel artificial metalloenzymes (ArMs), containing tris(pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA), for the atom economic oxidation of lignin β-O-4 model compounds, using hydrogen peroxide. The protein scaffold alters the selectivity of the reaction from a low yielding cleavage reaction when using the parent Fe-tpa complex to a high yielding benzylic alcohol oxidation when using the complex incorporated into a protein scaffold, SCP-2L A100C. Engineering the protein scaffold to incorporate glutamic acid was found to improve the ArM activity, showing that rational design of the protein environment using metal binding amino acids can be a first step toward improving the overall activity of an artificial metalloenzyme.


Metal: Fe
Anchoring strategy: Cystein-maleimide
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Lignin oxidation
Max TON: 20
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Reaction performed with a lignin model compound and hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent

Artificial Peroxidase-Like Hemoproteins Based on Antibodies Constructed from a Specifically Designed Ortho-Carboxy Substituted Tetraarylporphyrin Hapten and Exhibiting a High Affinity for Iron-Porphyrins

Mahy, J.-P.

FEBS Lett. 1996, 395, 73-76, 10.1016/0014-5793(96)01006-X

In order to get catalytic antibodies modelling peroxidases BALB/c mice have been immunized with iron(III)α,α,α,β‐mesotetrakis‐orthocarboxyphenyl‐porphyrin (Fe(ToCPP))‐KLH conjugates. Monoclonal antibodies have been produced by the hybridoma technology. Three antibodies, 2 IgG, and 1 IgG2a, were found to bind both Fe(ToCPP) and the free base ToCPPH2 with similar binding constants. None of those antibodies was found to bind tetraphenylporphyrin. Those results suggest that the recognition of Fe(ToCPP) by the antibodies was mainly due to the binding of the carboxylate groups to some amino acid residues of the protein. True K d values of 2.9 × 10−9 M and 5.5 × 10−9 M have been determined for the two IgG1‐Fe(ToCPP) complexes. Those values are the best ones ever reported for iron‐porphyrin‐antibody complexes. UV‐vis. studies have shown that the two IgG1‐Fe(ToCPP) complexes were highspin hexacoordinate iron(III) complexes, with no amino acid residue binding the iron, whereas the IgG2α‐Fe(ToCPP) complex was a low‐spin hexacoordinate iron(III) complex with two strong ligands binding the iron atom. Both IgG1 ‐Fe(ToCPP) complexes were found to catalyze the oxidation of 2,2′‐azinobis (3ethylbenzothiazoline‐6‐sulfonic acid (ABTS) 5‐fold more efficiently than Fe(ToCPP) alone whereas the binding of IgG2a to this iron‐porphyrin had no effect on its catalytic activity. k cat values of 100 min−1 and 63 min−1 and k cat/K m. values of 105 M−1 s−1 and 119 M−1 s−1 have been found respectively for the two IgG1‐Fe(ToCPP) complexes.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Host protein: Antibody 13G10
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: ---
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: kcat/KM = 105 M-1 * s-1

A Structural View of Synthetic Cofactor Integration into [FeFe]-Hydrogenases

Apfel, U.-P.; Happe, T.; Kurisu, G.

Chem. Sci. 2016, 7, 959-968, 10.1039/C5SC03397G

Crystal structures of semisynthetic [FeFe]-hydrogenases with variations in the [2Fe] cluster show little structural differences despite strong effects on activity.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: CN; CO; Dithiolate
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Chemical
Reaction: H2 evolution
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 4XDC
Notes: H2 evolution activity of the ArM: 2874 (mmol H2)*min-1*(mg protein)-1.

Biosynthesis of a Site-Specific DNA Cleaving Protein

Schultz, P.G.

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 13194-13195, 10.1021/ja804653f

An E. coli catabolite activator protein (CAP) has been converted into a sequence-specific DNA cleaving protein by genetically introducing (2,2′-bipyridin-5-yl)alanine (Bpy-Ala) into the protein. The mutant CAP (CAP-K26Bpy-Ala) showed comparable binding affinity to CAP-WT for the consensus operator sequence. In the presence of Cu(II) and 3-mercaptopropionic acid, CAP-K26Bpy-Ala cleaves double-stranded DNA with high sequence specificity. This method should provide a useful tool for mapping the molecular details of protein−nucleic acid interactions.


Metal: Cu
Ligand type: Bipyridine
Anchoring strategy: ---
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Catabolite activator protein from E. coli

Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Bipyridine
Anchoring strategy: ---
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Catabolite activator protein from E. coli

Capture and Characterization of a Reactive Haem– Carbenoid Complex in an Artificial Metalloenzyme

Hilvert, D.

Nat. Catal. 2018, 1, 578-584, 10.1038/s41929-018-0105-6

Non-canonical amino acid ligands are useful for fine-tuning the catalytic properties of metalloenzymes. Here, we show that recombinant replacement of the histidine ligand proximal to haem in myoglobin with Nδ-methylhistidine enhances the protein’s promiscuous carbene-transfer chemistry, enabling efficient styrene cyclopropanation in the absence of reductant, even under aerobic conditions. The increased electrophilicity of the modified Fe(iii) centre, combined with subtle structural adjustments at the active site, allows direct attack of ethyl diazoacetate to produce a reactive carbenoid adduct, which has an unusual bridging Fe(iii)–C–N(pyrrole) configuration as shown by X-ray crystallography. Quantum chemical calculations suggest that the bridged complex equilibrates with the more reactive end-on isomer, ensuring efficient cyclopropanation. These findings underscore the potential of non-canonical ligands for extending the capabilities of metalloenzymes by opening up new reaction pathways and facilitating the characterization of reactive species that would not otherwise accumulate.


Metal: Fe
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: ---
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 1000
ee: 99
PDB: 6F17
Notes: Structure of the Mb*(NMH) haem-iron complex

Metal: Fe
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: ---
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: 1000
ee: 99
PDB: 6G5B
Notes: Structure of the Mb*(NMH) haem-iron–carbenoid complex

Catalysis Without a Headache: Modification of Ibuprofen for the Design of Artificial Metalloenzyme for Sulfide Oxidation

Ménage, S.

J. Mol. Catal. A: Chem. 2016, 416, 20-28, 10.1016/j.molcata.2016.02.015

A new artificial oxidase has been developed for selective transformation of thioanisole. The catalytic activity of an iron inorganic complex, FeLibu, embedded in a transport protein NikA has been investigated in aqueous media. High efficiency (up to 1367 t), frequency 459 TON min−1 and selectivity (up to 69%) make this easy to use catalytic system an asset for a sustainable chemistry.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: BPHMEN
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: ---
Reaction: Sulfoxidation
Max TON: 1367
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: ---

Catalytic Cyclopropanation by Myoglobin Reconstituted with Iron Porphycene: Acceleration of Catalysis due to Rapid Formation of the Carbene Species

Hasegawa, J.-Y.; Lehnert, N.

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2017, 139, 17265-17268, 10.1021/jacs.7b10154

Myoglobin reconstituted with iron porphycene catalyzes the cyclopropanation of styrene with ethyl diazoacetate. Compared to native myoglobin, the reconstituted protein significantly accelerates the catalytic reaction and the kcat/Km value is 26-fold enhanced. Mechanistic studies indicate that the reaction of the reconstituted protein with ethyl diazoacetate is 615-fold faster than that of native myoglobin. The metallocarbene species reacts with styrene with the apparent second-order kinetic constant of 28 mM–1 s–1 at 25 °C. Complementary theoretical studies support efficient carbene formation by the reconstituted protein that results from the strong ligand field of the porphycene and fewer intersystem crossing steps relative to the native protein. From these findings, the substitution of the cofactor with an appropriate metal complex serves as an effective way to generate a new biocatalyst.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid; Porphycene
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: Reconstitution
Optimization: ---
Reaction: Cyclopropanation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Cyclopropanation of styrene with ethyl diazoacetate: kcat/KM = 1.3 mM-1 * s-1, trans/cis = 99:1

Chalcogenide Substitution in the [2Fe] Cluster of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Conserves High Enzymatic Activity

Apfel, U.-P.; Happe, T.

Dalton Trans. 2017, 46, 16947-16958, 10.1039/C7DT03785F

Combination of biological and chemical methods allow for creation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases with an artificial synthetic cofactor.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: CN; CO; Diselenolate
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Chemical
Reaction: H2 evolution
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 5OEF
Notes: ---

Construction and In Vivo Assembly of a Catalytically Proficient and Hyperthermostable De Novo Enzyme

Anderson, J.L.R.

Nat. Commun. 2017, 8, 10.1038/s41467-017-00541-4

Although catalytic mechanisms in natural enzymes are well understood, achieving the diverse palette of reaction chemistries in re-engineered native proteins has proved challenging. Wholesale modification of natural enzymes is potentially compromised by their intrinsic complexity, which often obscures the underlying principles governing biocatalytic efficiency. The maquette approach can circumvent this complexity by combining a robust de novo designed chassis with a design process that avoids atomistic mimicry of natural proteins. Here, we apply this method to the construction of a highly efficient, promiscuous, and thermostable artificial enzyme that catalyzes a diverse array of substrate oxidations coupled to the reduction of H2O2. The maquette exhibits kinetics that match and even surpass those of certain natural peroxidases, retains its activity at elevated temperature and in the presence of organic solvents, and provides a simple platform for interrogating catalytic intermediates common to natural heme-containing enzymes.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Oxidation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: Oxidation of 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazo-line-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS)

Coordination Chemistry of Iron(III)-Porphyrin-Antibody Complexes Influence on the Peroxidase Activity of the Axial Coordination of an Imidazole on the Iron Atom

Mahy, J.-P.

Eur. J. Biochem. 2002, 269, 470-480, 10.1046/j.0014-2956.2001.02670.x

An artificial peroxidase‐like hemoprotein has been obtained by associating a monoclonal antibody, 13G10, and its iron(III)–α,α,α,β‐meso‐tetrakis(ortho‐carboxyphenyl)porphyrin [Fe(ToCPP)] hapten. In this antibody, about two‐thirds of the porphyrin moiety is inserted in the binding site, its ortho‐COOH substituents being recognized by amino‐acids of the protein, and a carboxylic acid side chain of the protein acts as a general acid base catalyst in the heterolytic cleavage of the O–O bond of H2O2, but no amino‐acid residue is acting as an axial ligand of the iron. We here show that the iron of 13G10–Fe(ToCPP) is able to bind, like that of free Fe(ToCPP), two small ligands such as CN–, but only one imidazole ligand, in contrast to to the iron(III) of␣Fe(ToCPP) that binds two. This phenomenon is general for a series of monosubstituted imidazoles, the 2‐ and 4‐alkyl‐substituted imidazoles being the best ligands, in agreement with the hydrophobic character of the antibody binding site. Complexes of antibody 13G10 with less hindered iron(III)–tetraarylporphyrins bearing only one [Fe(MoCPP)] or two meso‐[ortho‐carboxyphenyl] substituents [Fe(DoCPP)] also bind only one imidazole. Finally, peroxidase activity studies show that imidazole inhibits the peroxidase activity of 13G10–Fe(ToCPP) whereas it increases that of 13G10–Fe(DoCPP). This could be interpreted by the binding of the imidazole ligand on the iron atom which probably occurs in the case of 13G10–Fe(ToCPP) on the less hindered face of the porphyrin, close to the catalytic COOH residue, whereas in the case of 13G10–Fe(DoCPP) it can occur on the other face of the porphyrin. The 13G10–Fe(DoCPP)–imidazole complex thus constitutes a nice artificial peroxidase‐like hemoprotein, with the axial imidazole ligand of the iron mimicking the proximal histidine of peroxidases and a COOH side chain of the antibody acting as a general acid‐base catalyst like the distal histidine of peroxidases does.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Host protein: Antibody 13G10
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: ---
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: kcat/KM = 15200 M-1 * s-1

Coordination Chemistry Studies and Peroxidase Activity of a New Artificial Metalloenzyme Built by the “Trojan Horse” Strategy

Mahy, J.-P.

J. Mol. Catal. A: Chem. 2010, 317, 19-26, 10.1016/j.molcata.2009.10.016

In the general context of green chemistry, a considerable research effort is devoted to the elaboration of new artificial metalloproteins that catalyze, under mild conditions, the oxidation of a wide range of organic compounds, using cheap and environmentally friendly oxidants. A new artificial hemoprotein was obtained by the so-called “Trojan horse” strategy involving the non-covalent insertion of a cationic iron–porphyrin–estradiol cofactor into an anti-estradiol antibody. UV–vis titrations showed the formation of a 1/2 antibody/cofactor complex with a dissociation constant KD = 4.10−7 M. UV–vis determination of the Fe-imidazole binding constants showed that the protein provided a weak steric hindrance around the iron–porphyrin cofactor. The antibody–estradiol–iron–porphyrin complex displayed a peroxidase activity and catalyzed the oxidation of ABTS by H2O2 with about double the efficiency of the iron–porphyrin–estradiol alone. Kinetic studies revealed that this was due to a faster formation of the intermediate high valent iron–oxo species in the presence of the antibody protein. Consequently, the association of an anti-estradiol antibody with an iron–porphyrin–estradiol cofactor leads to a new artificial hemoprotein with an interesting peroxidase activity and the “Trojan horse” strategy appears as a valuable method to generate artificial metalloenzymes that could act as biocatalysts for selective oxidations.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Host protein: Antibody 7A3
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: ---
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: k1 = 574 M-1 * min-1

Cross-Linked Artificial Enzyme Crystals as Heterogeneous Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

Cavazza, C.; Ménage, S.

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2017, 139, 17994-18002, 10.1021/jacs.7b09343

Designing systems that merge the advantages of heterogeneous catalysis, enzymology, and molecular catalysis represents the next major goal for sustainable chemistry. Cross-linked enzyme crystals display most of these essential assets (well-designed mesoporous support, protein selectivity, and molecular recognition of substrates). Nevertheless, a lack of reaction diversity, particularly in the field of oxidation, remains a constraint for their increased use in the field. Here, thanks to the design of cross-linked artificial nonheme iron oxygenase crystals, we filled this gap by developing biobased heterogeneous catalysts capable of oxidizing carbon–carbon double bonds. First, reductive O2 activation induces selective oxidative cleavage, revealing the indestructible character of the solid catalyst (at least 30 000 turnover numbers without any loss of activity). Second, the use of 2-electron oxidants allows selective and high-efficiency hydroxychlorination with thousands of turnover numbers. This new technology by far outperforms catalysis using the inorganic complexes alone, or even the artificial enzymes in solution. The combination of easy catalyst synthesis, the improvement of “omic” technologies, and automation of protein crystallization makes this strategy a real opportunity for the future of (bio)catalysis.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: ---
Host protein: NikA
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical
Max TON: 28000
ee: ---
PDB: 5ON0
Notes: Cross-Linked Enzyme Crystals (CLEC) as catalysts.

Metal: Fe
Ligand type: ---
Host protein: NikA
Anchoring strategy: Supramolecular
Optimization: Chemical
Max TON: 5900
ee: ---
PDB: 5ON0
Notes: Cross-Linked Enzyme Crystals (CLEC) as catalysts.

Crystal Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Myoglobin Reconstituted with Iron Porphycene

Hayashi, T

Inorg. Chem. 2006, 45, 10530-10536, 10.1021/ic061130x

The incorporation of an artificially created metal complex into an apomyoglobin is one of the attractive methods in a series of hemoprotein modifications. Single crystals of sperm whale myoglobin reconstituted with 13,16-dicarboxyethyl-2,7-diethyl-3,6,12,17-tetramethylporphycenatoiron(III) were obtained in the imidazole buffer, and the 3D structure with a 2.25-Å resolution indicates that the iron porphycene, a structural isomer of hemin, is located in the normal position of the heme pocket. Furthermore, it was found that the reconstituted myoglobin catalyzed the H2O2-dependent oxidations of substrates such as guaiacol, thioanisole, and styrene. At pH 7.0 and 20 °C, the initial rate of the guaiacol oxidation is 11-fold faster than that observed for the native myoglobin. Moreover, the stopped-flow analysis of the reaction of the reconstituted protein with H2O2 suggested the formation of two reaction intermediates, compounds II- and III-like species, in the absence of a substrate. It is a rare example that compound III is formed via compound II in myoglobin chemistry. The enhancement of the peroxidase activity and the formation of the stable compound III in myoglobin with iron porphycene mainly arise from the strong coordination of the Fe−His93 bond.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphycene
Host protein: Myoglobin (Mb)
Anchoring strategy: Reconstitution
Optimization: ---
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 1MBI
Notes: ---

Crystal Structure of Two Anti-Porphyrin Antibodies with Peroxidase Activity

Golinelli-Pimpaneau, B.

PLoS One 2012, 7, e51128, 10.1371/journal.pone.0051128

We report the crystal structures at 2.05 and 2.45 Å resolution of two antibodies, 13G10 and 14H7, directed against an iron(III)-αααβ-carboxyphenylporphyrin, which display some peroxidase activity. Although these two antibodies differ by only one amino acid in their variable λ-light chain and display 86% sequence identity in their variable heavy chain, their complementary determining regions (CDR) CDRH1 and CDRH3 adopt very different conformations. The presence of Met or Leu residues at positions preceding residue H101 in CDRH3 in 13G10 and 14H7, respectively, yields to shallow combining sites pockets with different shapes that are mainly hydrophobic. The hapten and other carboxyphenyl-derivatized iron(III)-porphyrins have been modeled in the active sites of both antibodies using protein ligand docking with the program GOLD. The hapten is maintained in the antibody pockets of 13G10 and 14H7 by a strong network of hydrogen bonds with two or three carboxylates of the carboxyphenyl substituents of the porphyrin, respectively, as well as numerous stacking and van der Waals interactions with the very hydrophobic CDRH3. However, no amino acid residue was found to chelate the iron. Modeling also allows us to rationalize the recognition of alternative porphyrinic cofactors by the 13G10 and 14H7 antibodies and the effect of imidazole binding on the peroxidase activity of the 13G10/porphyrin complexes.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Host protein: Antibody 13G10
Anchoring strategy: Antibody
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Peroxidation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 4AMK
Notes: ---

Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Porphyrin
Host protein: Antibody 14H7
Anchoring strategy: Antibody
Optimization: Chemical & genetic
Reaction: Peroxidation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 4AT6
Notes: ---

De Novo Design of Catalytic Proteins

DeGrado, W.F.

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2004, 101, 11566-11570, 10.1073/pnas.0404387101

The de novo design of catalytic proteins provides a stringent test of our understanding of enzyme function, while simultaneously laying the groundwork for the design of novel catalysts. Here we describe the design of an O2-dependent phenol oxidase whose structure, sequence, and activity are designed from first principles. The protein catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of 4-aminophenol (k cat/K M = 1,500 M·1·min·1) to the corresponding quinone monoimine by using a diiron cofactor. The catalytic efficiency is sensitive to changes of the size of a methyl group in the protein, illustrating the specificity of the design.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid
Host protein: Due Ferri
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Genetic
Reaction: Alcohol oxidation
Max TON: >100
ee: ---
PDB: ---
Notes: kcat/KM ≈ 1540 M-1*min-1

De Novo Design of Four-Helix Bundle Metalloproteins: One Scaffold, Diverse Reactivities

DeGrado, W.F.

Acc. Chem. Res. 2019, 10.1021/acs.accounts.8b00674

De novo protein design represents anattractive approach for testing and extending our under-standing of metalloprotein structure and function. Here, we describe our work on the design of DF (Due Ferri or two-ironin Italian), a minimalist model for the active sites of muchlarger and more complex natural diiron and dimanganeseproteins. In nature, diiron and dimanganese proteins protypi-cally bind their ions in 4-Glu, 2-His environments, and theycatalyze diverse reactions, ranging from hydrolysis, to O2-dependent chemistry, to decarbonylation of aldehydes. In the design of DF, the position of each atom including the backbone, the first-shell ligands, the second-shell hydrogen-bonded groups, and the well-packed hydrophobic core was bespoke using precise mathematical equations and chemical principles. The first member of the DF family was designed to be of minimal size and complexity and yet to display the quintessential elements required for binding the dimetal cofactor. After thoroughly characterizing its structural, dynamic, spectroscopic, and functional properties, we added additional complexity in a rational stepwise manner to achieve increasingly sophisticated catalytic functions, ultimately demonstrating substrate-gated four-electron reduction of O2to water. We also briefly describe the extension of these studies to the design of proteins that bind non biological metal cofactors (a synthetic porphyrin and a tetranuclear cluster), and a Zn2+/proton antiporting membrane protein. Together these studies demonstrate a successful and generally applicable strategy for de novo metalloprotein design, which might indeed mimic the process by which primordial metalloproteins evolved. We began the design process with a highly symmetrical backbone and binding site, by using point-group symmetry to assemble the secondary structures that position the amino acid side chains required for binding. The resulting models provided a rough starting point and initial parameters for the subsequent precise design of thefinal protein using modern methods of computational protein design. Unless the desired site is itself symmetrical, this process requires reduction of the symmetry or lifting it altogether. Nevertheless, the initial symmetrical structure can be helpful to restrain the search space during assembly of the backbone. Finally, the methods described here should be generally applicable to the design of highly stable and robust catalysts and sensors. There is considerable potential in combining the efficiency and knowledge base associated with homogeneous metal catalysis with the programmability, biocompatibility, and versatility of proteins. While the work reported here focuses on testing and learning the principles of natural metalloproteins by designing and studying proteins one at a time, there is also considerable potential for using designed proteins that incorporate both biological and non biological metal ion cofactors for the evolution of novel catalysts.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Amino acid
Host protein: Due Ferri
Anchoring strategy: Dative
Optimization: Computational design
Reaction: Oxidation
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 1EC5
Notes: Additional PDB: 1LT1

Design of Metal Cofactors Activated by a Protein–Protein Electron Transfer System

Watanabe, Y.

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2006, 103, 9416-9421, 10.1073/pnas.0510968103

Protein-to-protein electron transfer (ET) is a critical process in biological chemistry for which fundamental understanding is expected to provide a wealth of applications in biotechnology. Investigations of protein–protein ET systems in reductive activation of artificial cofactors introduced into proteins remains particularly challenging because of the complexity of interactions between the cofactor and the system contributing to ET. In this work, we construct an artificial protein–protein ET system, using heme oxygenase (HO), which is known to catalyze the conversion of heme to biliverdin. HO uses electrons provided from NADPH/cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) through protein–protein complex formation during the enzymatic reaction. We report that a FeIII(Schiff-base), in the place of the active-site heme prosthetic group of HO, can be reduced by NADPH/CPR. The crystal structure of the Fe(10-CH2CH2COOH-Schiff-base)·HO composite indicates the presence of a hydrogen bond between the propionic acid carboxyl group and Arg-177 of HO. Furthermore, the ET rate from NADPH/CPR to the composite is 3.5-fold faster than that of Fe(Schiff-base)·HO, although the redox potential of Fe(10-CH2CH2COOH-Schiff-base)·HO (−79 mV vs. NHE) is lower than that of Fe(Schiff-base)·HO (+15 mV vs. NHE), where NHE is normal hydrogen electrode. This work describes a synthetic metal complex activated by means of a protein–protein ET system, which has not previously been reported. Moreover, the result suggests the importance of the hydrogen bond for the ET reaction of HO. Our Fe(Schiff-base)·HO composite model system may provide insights with regard to design of ET biosystems for sensors, catalysts, and electronics devices.


Metal: Fe
Ligand type: Salophen
Host protein: Heme oxygenase (HO)
Anchoring strategy: Reconstitution
Optimization: Chemical
Reaction: O2 reduction
Max TON: ---
ee: ---
PDB: 1WZD
Notes: ---